King_HeadSpace

Annie King

Head Space

May 1 - 30 Mai


In Head Space, Annie King explores themes related to feelings of anxiety experienced from isolation and a pervasive longing to be connected to nature. Implicitly present in Annie King’s work are echoes emanating from industry and from nature. What emerges from the recessing, echoing, and reverberating movements in Head Space is Annie King’s particular response to a place that has shaped her identity as a Post Minimalist Northern Artist.

Dans Head Space, Annie King explore des thèmes liés aux sentiments d'anxiété éprouvés par l'isolement et un désir omniprésent d'être connecté à la nature. Implicitement présents dans le travail d'Annie King se trouvent des échos émanant de l'industrie et de la nature. Ce qui émerge des mouvements en retrait, en écho et en résonance dans Head Space est la réponse particulière d'Annie King à un lieu qui a façonné son identité en tant qu'artiste nordique post-minimaliste.

Annie King is an interdisciplinary artist, curator, and arts educator living in Sault Ste. Marie \ Baawaating. 

Annie King est une artiste interdisciplinaire, commissaire, et éducatrice  qui vit à Sault-Ste-Marie \ Baawaating.   

 
 

REVERBERATIONS IN ANNIE KING'S HEAD SPACE

Galerie Sans Clous, Sault Ste. Marie/Baawaating

by Isabelle Michaud, Curator

May 1 2022

In Head Space, Annie King explores themes related to feelings of anxiety experienced from isolation and a pervasive longing to be connected to nature. (1) Implicitly present in Annie King’s work are echoes emanating from industry and from nature. What emerges from the recessing, echoing, and reverberating movements in Head Space is Annie King’s particular response to a place that has shaped her identity as a Post Minimalist Northern Artist. (2)

Annie King lives in Sault Ste. Marie, known as Baawaating, the traditional territory of the Anishnabe, Ojibway, and Métis Nations of the Robinson-Huron Treaty of 1850. By the turn of the 20th century, the Sault, like many other Northern Ontario towns, followed a tragic industrialized path which saw the establishment of a steel industry and a paper mill. This industry not only devastated a large portion of the natural landscape of the region but it also eventually led to a stunting of the Visual Arts. As Jude Ortiz formulated in 2017 in her PhD thesis, the arts and creativity 

“...are typically seen within traditional economic frameworks, i.e. tangible outputs of cultural products with limited viability in generating wealth. This perspective poses challenges in drawing on residents’ creativity and local and/or regional cultural assets to transition through significant change.” (3)  

This challenging condition, created by living in an industrial and isolated community explains how Annie’s sensibilities carry specific antecedents as an artist. The presence of industrial or mechanical modes in her work is expressed by her choice of materials, by compositional geometric shapes, and the overall structure her installations take. It was a prevalent feature in a formative group exhibition, entitled the New Alberta Contemporaries (NAC), which showcased Annie’s work along with a number of emerging artists. In this exhibition, Annie’s Bearing consisted of a series of small orbs made of plaster, covered in graphite, methodically aligned on the floor on a bed of flour. (4) The NAC which marked the inaugural exhibition for the Esker Foundation in Edmonton Alberta, was curated by Caterina Pizanias. She describes Bearing as having an industrial feel,

“There is light shining onto the flour surface, at regular intervals projecting straight lines and numbers, an event that might be seen as having a rather industrial effect…” (5)

Another important work accompanying Bearing was a rectangular structure of burned cubes of wood, entitled Grid, reminiscent of Mona Hatoum’s Socle du monde in 1992. (6)  Pizanas writes,  “Bearing is at constant play of opposites…” which quite astutely describes the opposing forces still present in Annie King’s work ten years later. 

In an Instagram post about her For series of paintings, Annie King explains that “the process of the work begins with a controlled burning of the wood panels. This is an act of mediated destruction and creation.  Burning can be both an act of destruction but also of cleansing and rejuvenation.” (7)

King’s work aligns itself within a postminimalist approach.  What persists in her overall work are moments of anxiety, though much more of an underlying symptom than an overt one. It appears as an after-echo of a memory of a memory stemming from feelings of isolation, in the first place, and a strong desire to be at one with nature– a feeling typical of Postminimalist works– to embody it, and release its most powerful elements in the work in the second place. (8)

“ Postminimalists adopted a de-centered, flexible, open structure in their work; elevated the process of creation over its end result; employed techniques and materials that incorporated contingency and ephemerality; used the artist’s body and the natural and built environment as raw materials; and introduced signifiers of femininity into their work.” (9) 

The industrial versus the natural aspects in the work are not only expressed explicitly  through alignment, placement, and overall composition in King’s intermedia work but they also appear implicitly in what is not said or not done. 

 In Head Space, the dominant feature in the series of 15 cm2 square mixed media is charcoal on paper and chip bag refuse plastic. Each circular shape features stitching in repeated patterns. Inside the mixed media circles of the Head Space installation, Annie King has made use of charcoal powder harvested from burning. The forms created by the machine-sewned paper circles on chip bags are arranged in a series of 15 cm2 squares that could be described as resembling industrial gaskets, exhaust fittings, or maybe even food packets on a space station. Suspended from the ceiling in front of the wall of small multimedia squares is a paper screen of 50 cm2 onto which projections of circular phone app videos showing water, trees, and plants arranged in spinning rings around a circle can be seen moving slowly.

Annie King chose not to hand-stitch the work, which would have imparted the work with an intimate engagement.  Also absent largely in the work is colour, choosing instead to bring that into the video work which delays it, controls it, and sends it reflecting into the chip bag surface. The effect creates a nostalgic feeling similar to watching the last light of a setting sun. Text is not present which would provide some clues as to meaning, other than the title of the work. The Head Space pieces are also disconnected from each other, each little piece taking its own small space on the wall, isolated from each other. These are all examples of how the work implicitly reverberates isolation and anxiety.

The resulting effect in Head Space, ultimately then, is to elicit an internal response, a reflection, and to stimulate conversations relating to consumer behaviour, sustainability, relationships to art and place, and more specifically to enrich and broaden the understanding of Contemporary Arts  within the local visual arts community in Sault Ste. Marie/Baawaating.

(1) www.lagaleriesansclous.com

(2)Post Minimalism as defined by Robert Pincus-Witten, in 1971. See Oxford Reference.

(3)Jude Ortiz,  Culture, Creativity, and the arts: Building Resilience in Northern Ontario, A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the University of the West of England, Bristol for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Faculty of Arts, Creative Industries and Education May 21, 2017. Read the abstract here: file:///Users/isabellemichaud/Downloads/J.Ortiz_FINAL%20VERSION_Aug%204%202017.pdf

(4) Annie King, Bearings, https://anniekingmfa.wordpress.com/bearings/, 2013.

(5) Caterinas Pizanias, The New Alberta Contemporaries, 06.15 to 08.29 2012, Esker Foundation, 2012, p.27.

(6)  Mona Hatoum, Socle du monde, 1992. AGO - 2020. https://ago.ca/collection/object/96/293

(7) Annie King, Burning Panels, Instagram post of April 14th 2022.

(8) Annie King, Head Space, 2022.  (9) Grove Art Online Articles PDF, taken from the Grove Art Encyclopedia of American Art (2011). https://www.uwp.edu/learn/departments/art/upload/Grove-Art-Online-articles.pdf

Head Space d’Annie King : réverbérations

Galerie Sans Clous, Sault Ste. Marie/Baawaating

par Isabelle Michaud, Commissaire

1er mai 202



Dans Head Space, Annie King explore des thèmes liés aux sentiments d'anxiété éprouvés par l'isolement et un désir omniprésent d'être connectée à la nature. Implicitement présents dans le travail d'Annie King se trouvent des échos émanant de l'industrie et de la nature.(1) Ce qui émerge des mouvements en retrait, en écho et en résonance dans Head Space est la réponse particulière d'Annie King à un lieu qui a façonné son identité d'artiste post-minimaliste du nord.(2)

Annie King vit à Sault Ste. Marie, connu sous le nom de Baawaating, le territoire traditionnel des nations Anishnabe, Ojibway et Métis du Traité Robinson-Huron de 1850. Au tournant du 20e siècle, le Sault, comme beaucoup d'autres villes du Nord de l'Ontario, a suivi une trajectoire industrialisée tragique qui a vu l'implantation d'une sidérurgie et d'une usine des pâtes et papiers. Cette industrie a non seulement dévasté une grande partie du paysage naturel de la région, mais elle a également finalement conduit à un retard de croissance des arts visuels. Comme Jude Ortiz l'a formulé en 2017 dans sa thèse sur la créativité et les arts à Sault Ste. Marie, les arts et la créativité

«..sont généralement considérés dans des cadres économiques traditionnels, c'est-à-dire des résultats tangibles de produits culturels avec une viabilité limitée pour générer de la richesse. Cette perspective pose des défis pour tirer parti de la créativité des résidents et des atouts culturels locaux et/ou régionaux pour faire la transition vers des changements importants.» (3)

Cette condition difficile , créée par la vie dans une communauté industrielle et isolée, explique comment les sensibilités d'Annie portent des antécédents spécifiques en tant qu'artiste. La présence de modes industriels ou mécaniques dans son travail s'exprime par son choix de matériaux, par des formes géométriques de composition et la structure globale de ses installations. C'était une caractéristique prédominante dans une exposition de groupe formative, intitulée les New Alberta Contemporaries (NAC), qui présentait le travail d'Annie avec un certain nombre d'artistes émergents. Dans cette exposition, Bearing consistait en une série de petites orbes en plâtre, recouvertes de graphite, méthodiquement alignées au sol sur un lit de farine.(4) La NAC qui a marqué l'exposition inaugurale de la Fondation Esker à Edmonton en Alberta, a été organisée par Caterina Pizanias. Elle décrit Bearing comme ayant une atmosphère industrielle,

«Il y a de la lumière qui brille sur la surface de la farine, projetant à intervalles réguliers des lignes droites et des chiffres, un événement qui pourrait être considéré comme ayant un effet plutôt industriel...» (5)



Une autre œuvre importante accompagnant Bearing était une structure rectangulaire de cubes de bois brûlés, intitulée Grid, qui rappelle le Socle du monde de Mona Hatoum en 1992. (6) 

Dans une publication  Instagram à propos de sa série de peintures intitulée For, Annie King explique que « le processus de l'œuvre commence par une combustion contrôlée des panneaux de bois. Il s'agit d'un acte de destruction et de création médiatisées. Brûler peut être à la fois un acte de destruction mais aussi de purification et de rajeunissement.» (7)

Le travail de King s'inscrit dans une approche post-minimaliste. Ce qui persiste dans son travail global, ce sont des moments d'anxiété, bien qu'il s'agisse bien plus d'un symptôme sous-jacent que d'un symptôme manifeste. Elle apparaît comme un contre-écho du souvenir d'un souvenir issu de sentiments d'isolement, en premier lieu, et d'un fort désir de ne faire qu'un avec la nature – sentiment typique des œuvres post-minimalistes. L’artiste désire incarner la nature et libérer ses phénomènes les plus puissants dans le travail, en second lieu. (8)

« Les post-minimalistes ont adopté une structure décentrée, flexible et ouverte dans leur travail; élevé le processus de création sur son résultat final; employant des techniques et des matériaux qui incorporent la contingence et l'éphémère ; utilisé le corps de l'artiste et l'environnement naturel et bâti comme matières premières; et introduit des idées sur la féminité dans leur travail.» (9)

Les aspects industriels par rapport aux aspects naturels de l'œuvre ne sont pas seulement exprimés explicitement à travers l'alignement, le placement et la composition globale dans l'œuvre intermédia de King, mais ils apparaissent également implicitement dans ce qui n'est pas dit ou ce qui n’est pas fait.

Dans Head Space, la caractéristique dominante de la série de techniques mixtes carrées de 15 cm2 est le charbon sur papier et le plastique de déchets de sacs de chips. Chaque forme circulaire présente des coutures en motifs répétés. Dans les cercles de médias mixtes de l'installation Head Space, Annie King a utilisé de la poudre de charbon de bois récoltée lors de combustions diverses. Les formes créées par les cercles de papier cousus à la machine sur des sacs de croustilles sont disposées en une série de carrés de 15 cm2 qui pourraient être décrits comme ressemblant à des joints industriels, des raccords d'échappement ou peut-être même des paquets de nourriture sur une station spatiale. 


Suspendu au plafond devant le mur de petits carrés, se trouve un écran en papier de 50 cm2 sur lequel on voit se déplacer lentement des projections de vidéos circulaires conçues avec des applications téléphoniques montrant de l'eau, des arbres et des plantes disposés en anneaux tournants autour d'un cercle. Annie King a choisi de ne pas coudre ses oeuvres à la main, ce qui aurait conféré à l'œuvre un engagement intime. La couleur est également largement absente du travail physique, choisissant plutôt de l'introduire dans le travail vidéo ce qui donne l’effet de retarder la couleur en la contrôlant et la renvoyant sur la surface réfléchissante plastifiée des sacs de chips. 

L'effet crée une sensation nostalgique semblable à celle de regarder la dernière lumière d'un soleil couchant. L'inondation de la pièce en différentes couleurs atténue également le niveau de gris des petits carrés. Le texte n'est pas présent, ce qui fournirait des indices sur le sens, autre que le titre de l'exposition. Ce titre Head Space se réfère à une expression en anglais, signifiant avoir la capacité mentale pour fonctionner. Ce qu’Annie recherchait en créant ces oeuvres, ce sont ces moments de capacité mentale pour faire son travail. Elle recherchait la connexion avec la nature pour s’autogérer durant des moments d’anxiété face à la pandémie et face à l’isolation que les artistes vivent dans notre région..  Les pièces de Head Space sont également disposées d’une façon déconnectées les unes des autres, chaque petite pièce prenant son propre petit espace sur le mur, isolées les unes des autres. Ce sont tous des exemples de la façon dont l'œuvre résonne sur l'isolement et de l'enfermement.


Ce qui résulte dans Head Space, en fin de compte, est donc de susciter une réponse interne, une réflexion, et de stimuler les conversations relatives au comportement du consommateur, à la durabilité, aux relations à l'art et au lieu, et plus spécifiquement d'enrichir et d'élargir la compréhension de l'art contemporain au sein de la communauté locale des arts visuels à Sault Ste. Marie/Baawaating.


1) www.lagaleriesansclous.com

(2)Le Post-Minimalisme a été décrit par Robert Pincus-Witten, en 1971. Voir Oxford Reference.

(3)Jude Ortiz,  Culture, Creativity, and the arts: Building Resilience in Northern Ontario, A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the University of the West of England, Bristol for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Faculty of Arts, Creative Industries and Education May 21, 2017. Lisez le résumé ici: file:///Users/isabellemichaud/Downloads/J.Ortiz_FINAL%20VERSION_Aug%204%202017.pdf

(4) Annie King, Bearings, https://anniekingmfa.wordpress.com/bearings/, 2013.

(5) Caterinas Pizanias, The New Alberta Contemporaries, 06.15 to 08.29 2012, Esker Foundation, 2012, p.27.

(6)  Mona Hatoum, Socle du monde, 1992. AGO - 2020. https://ago.ca/collection/object/96/293

(7) Annie King, Burning Panels, Instagram post of April 14th 2022.

(8) Annie King, Head Space, 2022.  

(9) Grove Art Online Articles PDF, taken from the Grove Art Encyclopedia of American Art (2011). https://www.uwp.edu/learn/departments/art/upload/Grove-Art-Online-articles.pdf